The Investment that Never Loses Value: Second in a Three-Part Series “Why Buy Antiques?”

Anybody can buy “collectible” items to display on a shelf.
You see ads for them all the time: “Hand painted!” “Limited edition!” “Design of enduring value!”
But will they hold their value?
They may. Then again, they may not.

One good example is the Cabbage Patch dolls.
Beginning in 1981, they were purposely designed by Coleco to be “collectible,” so people bought them up (actually, people fought each other to buy them up).
As a result, there are a gazillion dolls out there, all in mint condition in their original boxes.
Only those made under the Xavier Roberts name – before the collecting craze began – are worth anything at all.
There’s a good reason for that.
Xavier Roberts designed his dolls to be enjoyed by children.

1978 Xavier Roberts Cabbage Patch dollPhoto Courtesy of Caleb Murdock, AntiqueBazaar on Etsy

1978 Xavier Roberts Cabbage Patch doll
Photo Courtesy of Caleb Murdock, AntiqueBazaar on Etsy

Virtually all antiques and vintage items were created to be used, not collected.
There was a time when juice was served in brilliant, hand-cut glasses. When the table was cleaned with hand painted tole ware crumb catchers and tossed into a hand painted tole ware wastebasket. When the family walked to the neighborhood street fair and came home with prizes (or “fairings”) for dunking the clown or winning the coin toss. And there was a time when mayonnaise was served in lovely lusterware condiment sets, complete with spoon.

Noritake condiment set, circa 1920s.

Noritake condiment set, circa 1920s.

Through the decades, many of these items were broken and tossed away.
The survivors have become scarce in a natural and genuine manner – they’re collectible precisely because they were once loved, treasured, used, saved – and passed on to the next generation.

Vintage items and antiques have proven their worth.
Sure, a particular type of antique can enjoy ups and downs in popularity and price. Fiesta’s heyday was in the 1980s; lusterware in the 90s.

But price isn’t the only way to measure returns on investments.
The true value of last century’s things is in their stories, their histories, their pure and genuine charm. Since these things cannot be measured in dollars, pounds or francs, it guarantees that an investment in antiques will always have a positive return.

If you love learning about antiques as much as I do, follow the blog so you won’t miss the next article.
And enjoy the hunt!

Advertisements

About sarathurston

I'm a marketing communications writer who also loves antiques and collectibles. You can find my shop on Etsy at http://www.etsy.com/shop/JanvierRoad
This entry was posted in Antiques, Collectibles, Etsy, Other Vintage Things, Toleware, Why Are Antiques Important? and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Investment that Never Loses Value: Second in a Three-Part Series “Why Buy Antiques?”

  1. Pingback: The Investment that Never Loses Value: Second in a Three-Part Series “Why Buy Antiques?” | From the desk of Sara Thurston

I'd love to hear your thoughts (and corrections)!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s