What’s so Great About Antiques? First in a Three-Part Series

Think about the last time someone complimented you on something that you own.
Did their comment trigger an automatic “thank you?” Or did you launch into a fascinating story about its origin?
If you told a story, I’ll bet the item was vintage or antique.
Maybe it was handed down to you from a favorite relative.
Maybe you bought it for a song at a yard sale. Maybe you even spent a lot on it, because you loved the way it looked or what it represented.

This is no ordinary 1950s knick-knack. It’s an original fairing – a souvenir of 19th Century European street fairs (like those shown on “Downton Abbey”). Knowing an antique’s history adds immense value to even the simplest items.

This is no ordinary 1950s knick-knack. It’s an original fairing – a souvenir of 19th Century European street fairs (like those shown on “Downton Abbey”). Knowing an antique’s history adds immense value to even the simplest items.

A beautiful newly-made item simply reflects your good taste.
But a beautiful older item reveals something unique about you — and a style that sets you apart from the ordinary.

Victorian and Edwardian ladies had notebooks like this to list the scheduled dances and promised dance partners. Her anticipation of a delightful evening (and potential husband) still lives on more than 100 years later! Photo courtesy of Adorn by Samouce, Etsy

Victorian and Edwardian ladies had notebooks like this to list the scheduled dances and promised dance partners. The excited anticipation of a delightful evening (and potential husband) still lives on more than 100 years later! Photo courtesy of Adorn by Samouce, Etsy

Of course, you could always buy new things, and create your own stories to pass along to the next generation.
But there’s just something about items with a rich past of their own that makes them special.
Their presence sparks the imagination and makes history come alive in a way that no book, video, or photograph can do. That’s because, when you hold an antique, you are literally holding history in your hands.

The 1902 Sunbonnet Babies primer was used by countless schoolchildren. The Royal Bayreuth porcelains were early versions of "spinoff" products!

The 1902 Sunbonnet Babies primer was used by countless schoolchildren. The Royal Bayreuth porcelains were early versions of “spinoff” products!

Antiques and vintage items prove that life endures through happiness and tears, through wars, natural disasters and cultural changes. They give us hope that their stories – and the ones we add to them — will continue for generations to come.

If you love learning about antiques as much as I do, follow the blog so you won’t miss the next article.
And enjoy the hunt!

Advertisements

About sarathurston

I'm a marketing communications writer who also loves antiques and collectibles. You can find my shop on Etsy at http://www.etsy.com/shop/JanvierRoad
This entry was posted in Antiques, Collectibles, Etsy, Fairings, Why Are Antiques Important? and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to What’s so Great About Antiques? First in a Three-Part Series

  1. Pingback: What’s so Great About Antiques? First in a Three-Part Series | From the desk of Sara Thurston

  2. Pingback: I need to share this one – What’s so Great About Antiques? First in a Three-Part Series – A must read! | oldnsalvagedtreasure

  3. I’ve learned so much from your blog. Thank you so much! You’ve helped me through some frustrating moments:)

    Rita

  4. sarathurston says:

    Thanks! I’m glad you liked it!

  5. JR: a great post, and i’ve reposted…thanks for sharing!! RT

  6. Pingback: What’s so Great About Antiques? First in a Three-Part Series | The Rag Tree

I'd love to hear your thoughts (and corrections)!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s